Donald Trump
Paul J. Richards/Getty Images

More Dump Trump

Columnist Sees Irony in Univision's Defense of Mexicans

"Rapper Flo Rida, the Macy's department store chain and football Hall of Famer Emmitt Smith all had something in common on Wednesday: They're the latest to distance themselves from Donald Trump following his remarks about Mexican immigrants," David Bauder reported Wednesday for the Associated Press.

Advertisement

"The Republican presidential hopeful's team is struggling to hold the Miss USA pageant together following defections by hosts, performers, judges and the two television networks that were scheduled to broadcast the event on July 12. Trump, who fired back at Macy's, owns the Miss USA and Miss Universe pageants. . . ."

In addition, "Mexico dropped out of the pageant and Bogota withdrew its candidacy to host his Miss Universe show," Agence France-Presse reported.

Advertisement

In his syndicated column for the Washington Post Writers Group, Ruben Navarrette Jr. found "surreal" Trump's battle with Univision, which like NBC severed ties with Trump over comments in his speech announcing his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination on June 16.

"When Mexico sends its people, they're not sending their best," Trump said. "They're not sending you. They're sending people that have lots of problems, and they're bringing those problems with us. They're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're rapists. And some, I assume, are good people."

Advertisement

Navarrette wrote Wednesday, "let's remember, this whole thing started because Trump sees Mexican migrants as inferior — a view that, judging from its own regular programming, the nation's largest Spanish-speaking television network seems to tolerate and perpetuate.

"Have you ever seen one of those popular Mexican soap operas that make Univision so much money? Or taken a good look at the anchors and reporters who deliver the news on the network? Generally speaking, you won't find a more light-skinned and fair-haired bunch.

Advertisement

"These are hardly the sort of folks who get doors slammed in their faces in Mexico and can't wait to migrate to the United States. These are the kind of people who are content to stay in Mexico. The network stars might give lip service to supporting migrants, but I don’t see how they could possibly relate to them.

"It's both ironic and sad that a network that made billions broadcasting throughout Latin America looks nothing like most of Latin America. Now Univision, in its war with Trump, emerges as the de-facto savior for Mexican immigrants. How did that happen? . . ."

Advertisement

Trump said after Macy's announcement, "Clearly, NBC and Macy's support illegal immigration, which is totally detrimental to the fabric of our once great country. Both Macy's and NBC totally caved at the first sight of potential difficulty with special interest groups who are nothing more than professional agitators, who are not looking out for the people they purport to represent, but only for themselves.

"It is people like this that are actually running our country because our leaders are weak and ineffective."

Advertisement

Jamelle Bouie, Slate: The GOP Base Loves Trump

Aaron Couch, Hollywood Reporter: Anti-Donald Trump Billboard Circling Macy's Headquarters (Dec. 23, 2012) 

Advertisement

Adolfo Flores, BuzzFeed: How Latino Organizations Took On A Blowhard And Won

inquisitr.com: Rosalyn Sanchez And Other Latinos Unite Against Donald Trump

Mark Joyella, TVNewser: Jorge Ramos Still Wants to Interview Donald Trump

Celeste Katz, Daily News, New York: George Pataki calls on Donald Trump to stop 'divisive rhetoric' about immigrants

Advertisement

John Koblin, New York Times: Donald Trump Sues Univision for Dropping Pageant Broadcast

Latino Rebels: Putting Trump's Ridiculously Racist Anti-Mexican Comments Into Context

Advertisement

Andres Oppenheimer, Miami Herald: Where's the Republican outrage over Trump's diatribe?

Néstor David Pastor, Latino Rebels: Anatomy of a Trumpazo (July 2)

Felix Sanchez, CNN: How Trump's comments unleashed 'Latino Spring'

Another Reporter Quits; Can't Afford to Live on Her Salary

Eyebrows were raised in April when Natalie Caula Hauff was announced as part of a team awarded the Pulitzer Prize for public service. Hauff had already left the Post and Courier in Charleston, S.C., for public relations, saying that newspaper work was too demanding.

Advertisement

Her story was similar to that of Rob Kuznia of the Daily Breeze in Torrance, Calif., who shared a Pulitzer for local reporting. He, too, was working in public relations when the prizes were announced. "He said it was too difficult to make ends meet on his newspaper salary while renting in the LA area," Kevin Roderick reported for LAObserved.

Now it's Courtenay Edelhart's turn.

Edelhart wrote Monday to her Facebook friends, "I have been a newspaper reporter all my adult life. No, before that. I wrote for all my school newspapers as a kid. I made homemade newspapers out of spiral notebooks in kindergarten. That's how long I've loved journalism. Except for a couple fast food gigs in high school, it's the only job I've ever had.

Advertisement

"But print media are dying, hemorrhaging advertisers and readers at an alarming rate. Journalists are being laid off in droves, and the survivors are asked to take round after round of pay cuts. Today, after 26 years in this business, my annual salary is only about $10,000 more than my first entry-level job out of college. I can't support a family on what I make. I can't even support ME on what I make. Something has to give.

"Now. So today, with a heavy heart, I gave notice. Effective Aug. 14, I am resigning from The Bakersfield Californian. I will be enrolling at College of the Canyons in August to begin a two-year paralegal program. It's still research and writing, which is pretty much all I know how to do. . . . So, farewell Bakersfield. It's been a good run — seven years. I could never have survived as long as I did without the safety net of cherished friends and a synagogue that refused to let me feel poor. I love you all, and I will miss you, but it's time to jump off this cliff. I choose to believe I will not crash onto rocks below. I choose, instead, to soar."

Advertisement

Edelhart added for Journal-isms Wednesday that she is a Chicago native whose family now lives in Los Angeles.

"My ultimate career goal was to get hired at either my hometown newspaper, The Chicago Tribune, or the Los Angeles Times, located in my adopted, post-college home," she messaged. But Tribune Co., parent company of both newspapers, filed for protection from bankruptcy. "So that's how I landed in Bakersfield, possibly the last family-owned newspaper in the state."

Advertisement

Robert Price, executive editor of the Californian, told Journal-isms on Wednesday that he understood.

"We live and work in a time of difficult transition," Price said by email. "Media executives — those of us who still have jobs — are working hard to recapture lost revenue and discover new so that this vital thing we all cherish can endure.

Advertisement

"We're working hard to create and restore connections with consumers of news in an era of dramatic change. In the meantime, budgets have been cut, jobs frozen, salaries locked. So, yes, it's very difficult for many journalists today. Industrywide, we're losing good people like Courtenay Edelhart. I wish it weren't so."

Bernie Lunzer, president of the Newspaper Guild-Communications Workers of America, called the trend "tragic and dangerous. We know that as journalism is hollowed out, valuable information will go missing," he said by email.

Advertisement

"You can't have a functioning America without quality, trusted information. It is time to examine the digital revolution and what it has wrought. Is it right for Google (or Facebook) to use others' content to sell ads against, and provide little or nothing new of their own? I think many of us see the problem, yet the solution eludes us.

"Media organizations need to band together to find a way to protect and charge for their content. Otherwise we'll continue to have excellent journalists leaving for legal, PR, lobbying and other pursuits. Who loses — everyone."

Advertisement

Courtenay Edelhart, Bakersfield Californian: Falsely co-opting black identity is an insult (June 12)

Jim Romenesko blog: MEMO: 'IT’S TIME FOR DENVER POST 4.0!'

Nigerian Journalist Says He Was Beaten Into a Coma

A Nigerian journalist says that suspected smugglers upset by reporting about them beat him into a coma last week "in full glare of the public" on the premises of the Nigeria Customs Service, according to news reports Wednesday.

Advertisement

Comrade Deji Elumoye, an official of the Nigeria Union of Journalists, said Tuesday that "the leadership of the union has instructed its team of lawyers to file charges, which includes but not limited to attempted-murder, accessory, aiding and abetting, manslaughter, harassment and assault, among others, against the Service and some of its officers, in order to see that justice is done on the matter," Nigeria's PM News reported.

The journalist, Yomi Olomofe, who is executive director and editorial board chairman of the Badagry-based Prime Magazine, gave this account to the Vanguard newspaper:

I was with another colleague of mine on a visit to the command, when some smugglers, who claimed that journalists have been writing negative stories about them, pounced on me.

Advertisement

"While beating me, they threatened to kill me so as to serve as deterrent to journalists writing stories about them.

"I was there with the correspondent of Tide Newspaper, thank God a friend from Rotary Club came to take me away, I would have been dead, because I was left there almost lifeless.

Advertisement

"These hoodlums are not unknown. They are known to everybody, but they are above the law. They even told me that they have killed many people and nothing happened."

Adunni Amodeni added for naij.com, "He claimed he had been invited there by Ibrahim Turaki, an assistant comptroller general in-charge of import activities, to mediate between the commission and a journalist from Tide newspaper, who was working on an investigative story concerning the impropriety in import activities at the border."

Advertisement

Amodeni also wrote, "Telling of his ordeal to Punch Metro, Olomofe claimed that the customs officers looked away as he was being attacked.

"He said: 'There were four men who pounced on me while I was on the NCS, Seme Area Command premises. They were shouting on top of their voices, "We will kill you today. When we kill you today, other journalists will leave this place alone." The most notorious of them is known as Alhaji Momoh, otherwise called Basket. The others are Elijah and Shehu. The fourth person is unknown. They came with cudgels before they carried me to a nearby refuse dump. It was when they hit me on the head that I knew they intended to kill me'.

Advertisement

Elumoye, the union official, "enjoined journalists in the country not to be deterred by what happened to 'one of our colleagues' but rather brace up for more challenges in the course of duty, if they are to live up to their billing in exposing the ills and rots in the society ," PM News Nigeria reported.

Journalists Advised to Add Context to Church Burnings

"Over the last two weeks, six Black churches in the south have been burned to the ground," Denise Clay wrote Wednesday for alldigitcracy.org.

Advertisement

"While there are reports that the latest church burning, the Mount Zion African Episcopal Church in [Greeleyville], South Carolina, was the result of the church being struck by lightning, it, and the other six church burnings, are still under state and federal investigation.

"Since many of these fires have occurred in the days following last month's shootings at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, the incidents have brought back memories for some of the days when organized hate groups would bring their campaigns of racial intimidation and fear to the sanctuary doors of the black church.

Advertisement

"But so far, the majority of the news media has been hesitant to make the connection, which has led to conversations like this:

Advertisement

Clay offered this advice for journalists, "A) Do your homework: Journalism is as much about patterns as it is anything else. If you're getting information like, say, six black churches being burned to the ground in two weeks, dive into your history books. See if there’s a pattern and include that in your reporting.

Advertisement

"Also, you can go to the Southern Poverty Law Center and access their treasure trove of information on things like this and their reports on hate and extremism can give you a lot of useful information. The organization's blog Hatewatch also has a lot of information that comes in real time. (Disclosure: I used to write for Hatewatch.)

"(B) Do some legwork: The neighborhoods where these church burnings are taking place are filled with people who can help you with the context you need to cover stories like this thoroughly. There are stories and information that they have that you won’t get if you don’t go out and gather it. . . ."

Advertisement

Ron Allen, NBC News: S.C. Governor: Lightning Likely Cause of Fire at Mount Zion AME Church

Alan Blinder and Richard Pérez-Peña, New York Times: Lightning Believed Cause of Fire at a Black Church

Advertisement

Emma Green, the Atlantic: Black Churches Are Burning Again in America

Kate Groetzinger, Quartz: Black churches are burning while the US declares victory over a flag

Advertisement

Jack Jenkins, Think Progress: Why 'Unconnected' Church Burnings Can Still Be Racist

Twitchy: Media accused of ignoring black church fires after obsessing over single CVS arson; NAACP speaks up

Advertisement

Police Killings of Mentally Ill Demonstrate Lack of Training

"Nationwide, police have shot and killed 124 people this year who . . . were in the throes of mental or emotional crisis, according to a Washington Post analysis," Wesley Lowery, Kimberly Kindy and Keith L. Alexander reported for the front page of the Washington Post's Tuesday print edition. 

Advertisement

Their report is part of a continuing series in which the Post is compiling a database of every fatal shooting in the United States by a police officer in the line of duty in 2015.

"The dead account for a quarter of the 462 people shot to death by police in the first six months of 2015," the story continued.

Advertisement

"The vast majority were armed, but in most cases, the police officers who shot them were not responding to reports of a crime. More often, the police officers were called by relatives, neighbors or other bystanders worried that a mentally fragile person was behaving erratically, reports show. More than 50 people were explicitly suicidal.

"More than half the killings involved police agencies that have not provided their officers with state-of-the-art training to deal with the mentally ill. And in many cases, officers responded with tactics that quickly made a volatile situation even more dangerous.

Advertisement

"The Post analysis provides for the first time a national, real-time tally of the shooting deaths of mentally distraught individuals at the hands of law enforcement. Criminal-justice experts say that police are often ill equipped to respond to such individuals — and that the encounters too often end in needless violence. . . ."

Andy Cush, Gawker: Texas Town Is Charging Us $79,000 for Emails About Pool Party Abuse Cop

Advertisement

Kevin Eck, TVSpy: Viewers Mad at WCPO Again After Story on Cop Killer's Funeral

Textbooks, Monuments Still Lie About Confederacy

"History is the polemics of the victor, William F. Buckley allegedly said," author James W. Loewen, emeritus professor of sociology at the University of Vermont, wrote Wednesday for the Washington Post.

Advertisement

"Not so in the United States, at least not regarding the Civil War. As soon as Confederates laid down their arms, some picked up their pens and began to distort what they had done, and why. Their resulting mythology went national a generation later and persists — which is why a presidential candidate can suggest that slavery was somehow pro-family, and the public believes that the war was mainly fought over states' rights.

"The Confederates won with the pen (and the noose) what they could not win on the battlefield: the cause of white supremacy and the dominant understanding of what the war was all about. We are still digging ourselves out from under the misinformation that they spread, which has manifested in both our history books and our public monuments.

Advertisement

"Take Kentucky. Kentucky's legislature voted not to secede, and early in the war, Confederate Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston ventured through the western part of the state and found 'no enthusiasm as we imagined and hoped but hostility . . . in Kentucky.' Eventually, 90,000 Kentuckians would fight for the United States, while 35,000 fought for the Confederate States. Nevertheless, according to historian Thomas Clark, the state now has 72 Confederate monuments and only two Union ones. . . ."

Loewen is author of "Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong" and "The Confederate and Neo-Confederate Reader: The 'Great Truth' about the 'Lost Cause'. "

Advertisement

Maurice Berger, "Lens" blog, New York Times: Making a Confederate Flag Invisible

Margaret Biser, vox.com: I used to lead tours at a plantation. You won't believe the questions I got about slavery.

Advertisement

Mark Bowes, Richmond (Va.) Times-Dispatch: Attorney: Man who defaced Jefferson Davis monument is sorry, will plead guilty

Lee A. Daniels, National Newspaper Publishers Association: Has the 'Lost Cause' Finally Lost?

Advertisement

Jarvis DeBerry, NOLA.com | the Times-Picayune: Ku Klux Klan defends its flag. Is that all it's doing?

Sam Fulwood III, Center for American Progress: Confronting White Privilege

Peter Holley, Washington Post: Why this black defender of the Confederate flag says slavery was 'a choice'

Advertisement

Jason Lynch, adweek.com: TV Land Pulls Dukes of Hazzard Reruns

Julianne Malveaux, National Newspaper Publishers Association: Rewriting Confederate History 

Advertisement

Maurie McInnis, Slate: "Richmond Reoccupied by Men Who Wore the Gray" 

Courtland Milloy, Washington Post: Is America ready to deal with slavery, or just continue to miss the point? 

Advertisement

Susan Page and Erin Raftery, USA Today: Poll: After Charleston, a nation divided on the Confederate flag

Bob Pockrass, ESPN: Daytona to offer Confederate flag exchange this race weekend

Advertisement

John Sims, Racialicious: Art as Remembrance and Creative Resistance: John Sims' Flag Funerals

s.e. smith, care2com: South Carolina's History Curriculum on Slavery Is Appalling 

Advertisement

Jacqueline Thomsen, Inside Higher Ed: The Power of Names

J. Peder Zane, News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C.: As a testament to Charleston families' mercy, take down Raleigh monument

Advertisement

Obama Opposition to Team Name Thwarts Move

"Efforts to lure the Washington Redskins back to the District [of Columbia] have come up against a potentially insurmountable challenge: the Obama administration's objections to the team's name," Jonathan O'Connell reported Wednesday for the Washington Post.

Advertisement

"Interior Secretary Sally Jewell told D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser this spring that the National Park Service, which owns the land beneath Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium, was unlikely to accommodate construction of a new stadium for the Redskins unless the team changes its name.

"Jewell oversees both national park land and America's trust and treaty relationships with Native American tribes.

Advertisement

"Her decision not to extend the District's lease of the RFK land badly hinders Bowser's bid to return the Redskins to D.C. — and boosts efforts to lure the team across the Potomac to Northern Virginia.

"Since joining the Obama administration two years ago, Jewell has repeatedly echoed the president's concern that the name is offensive to Native Americans. Last fall she called the name a 'relic of the past' that should be changed.

Advertisement

" 'Personally, I think we would never consider naming a team the "Blackskins" or the "Brownskins" or the "Whiteskins." So, personally, I find it surprising that in this day and age, the name is not different,' Jewell told ABC News. . . ."

Meanwhile, the White House announced Wednesday that Obama will address the 106th NAACP Annual Convention in Philadelphia on July 14.

Advertisement

Jennifer Agiesta, CNN: Obama's approval rating grows following memorable week

Brian Bull, ideastream.org: United Church Of Christ Calls Foul On Chief Wahoo, Redskins

Advertisement

Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune: Obama's new 'bucket' attitude

5 Reasons Puerto Rico Is Treated More Like a Colony

"Everyone born on the island of Puerto Rico is a U.S. citizen who enjoys the same rights as any other citizen — provided they're willing to move to one of the 50 U.S. states," Roque Planas and Adriana Usero wrote Wednesday for HuffPost LatinoVoices.

Advertisement

"Those who remain on the island, however, are subject to a series of rules that limit their self-determination and participation in U.S. democracy.

"Despite the fact that Puerto Ricans are full-fledged Americans, the island is neither a U.S. state nor an independent country. The name for its unique status in U.S. law is 'commonwealth.' Yet for all intents and purposes, this political status has granted the island a separate and unequal designation more akin to a colony.

Advertisement

"Being treated as a possession rather than a partner has made it much more difficult for Puerto Rico to dig itself out from under its more than $70 billion debt. The island is facing a historic default on its debt, which Gov. Alejandro García Padilla said this week is 'unpayable.'

"Here are five ways Puerto Rico is being treated more like a colony than a U.S. state or an independent country — making it harder for the island to tackle its economic disaster. . . .'

Advertisement

Juan Gonzalez, Daily News, New York: Puerto Rico — like Greece — will default on its debts, as the U.S. has ignored the island's financial problems for decades

Errol Louis, Daily News, New York: Puerto Rico's crisis is ours, too: Rescuing the island from its fiscal emergency should be on the agenda of every presidential candidate

Advertisement

ProPublica Offering $4,500 Stipends to Students of Color

"Are you a college student of color interested in doing great journalism?" ProPublica asked on Monday.

Advertisement

"ProPublica wants to help. We are a nonprofit investigative newsroom and we're offering stipends to five minority students who work or want to work at college journalism outlets — newspapers, websites, radio stations or TV stations. We want to make college journalism accessible to students for whom it would otherwise be economically out of reach. Students can apply for the stipends annually. Those selected will receive $4,500 per semester.

"Each student in our Emerging Reporters Program will also receive ongoing mentoring from ProPublica's reporters and editors. We'll also bring you to our newsroom in New York for a week. . . ."

Advertisement

Meanwhile, the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland announced a Saturday-only, four-course graduate program aimed at moving careers into overdrive. "The two-semester, 12-credit graduate certificate program (two classes each semester) is designed for working professionals. Classes meet on Saturdays, so there's no conflict with work schedules. . . ."

Short Takes

"It's been a rough couple of years for Spain: the country's economy is in shambles, Catalonia wants to leave the nation, the men's soccer team had an inglorious exit during last year's World Cup, and now the United States has more Spanish speakers than the country where the language was born," Fox News Latino reported on Wednesday. "A new study by the Instituto Cervantes found that while Mexico still is far and away the country with the most Spanish speakers, with over 121 million people speaking the language, the U.S. sits second worldwide with close to 53 million Spanish speakers. . . ."

Advertisement

In Philadelphia, "New management at CBS3 has axed three of the station's biggest on-air names — Beasley Reece, Kathy Orr and Chris May," Jenny DeHuff reported Tuesday for the Philadelphia Daily News. "Just before 5 p.m. tonight, Eyewitness News anchor May tweeted: 'I've anchored my last broadcast at CBS3. Hope to see you all again.' A source close to the station informed me tonight that the new general manager at the station has been on a mission to 'turn things around' because of unsatisfactory ratings and people are being let go left and right. . . ."

In Phoenix, "12 News is proud to welcome Vanessa Ruiz to our late news anchor team, alongsideMark CurtisCaribe Devine, and Bruce Cooper weeknights at 5 p.m., 6 p.m. and 10 p.m.," the station announced on Tuesday. "Ruiz joins 12 News from KNBC in Los Angeles, where she's brought her incredible energy and spirit to help brighten the mornings of SoCal residents on 'Today LA.' . . ."
"Noticias Telemundo announced today that its award-winning national newscast, 'Noticiero Telemundo,' will air a special 'Digital Day' edition shot on mobile devices on Monday, July 6 at 6:30 PM/5:30 C," Telemundo said on Wednesday. "This will mark the first-time on record that a national network produces and airs a newscast shot on mobile technology. 'We are changing the way news is made by embracing all aspects of digital technology,' said Luis Carlos Velez, Telemundo's Executive Vice President of Network News. . . ."

Advertisement

"Mark Hinojosa will join the Missouri School of Journalism as an associate professor of convergence journalism," Suzette T. Heiman, a professor and spokeswoman for the school, messaged Journal-isms on Tuesday. Hinojosa, who joined the Detroit News as new-media director in 2008 after being laid off as associate managing editor for multimedia at the Chicago Tribune, was laid off from the News in May.

"Anchor-reporter Curtis Jackson has joined the 7 Action News team at Scripps-owned ABC affiliate WXYZ Detroit (DMA 12)," TVNewsCheck reported on Tuesday. "Jackson comes to the station from Cincinnati, where he anchored the 5:30 p.m. newscast on WKRC, and the 10 p.m. newscast on sister station WSTR. . . ."

Advertisement

"Univision announced a leadership reorganization at its radio division last week," Veronica Villafañe reported Tuesday for her Media Moves site. "But it failed to disclose that the change included eliminating talk show programming and switching Univision América into a music and paid programming AM radio network. Univision América's three remaining personality-driven talk shows 'Doctora Isabel' and 'Fernando Espuelas' were cancelled effective Thursday, June 25. . . ."

"Former CBS' The Early Show and ABC's Good Morning America Weekend personality Marysol Castro has joined ESPN to host Premier Boxing Champions," Brian Flood reported Wednesday for TVNewser. "Castro will also be a reporter on ESPN's Little League World Series telecasts and begins work on July 11 at 9 p.m. when PBC premieres on the network. . . ."

Advertisement

The saga of Henry Louis Gates' "Finding Your Roots" and actor Ben Affleck "is a classic cautionary tale," Jack Mirkinson wrote Wednesday for Gawker. Gates was rebuked by PBS after Affleck discovered that an ancestor was a slaveholder and asked that Gates not include that in his series. Gates did not. "The lesson here is that celebrities ruin everyone who comes into contact with them," Mirkinson wrote. "If you are someone with a reputation to maintain, you should stay far away from famous people because they will torch that hard-won status immediately, often without even knowing they are doing it. . . ."

"Moroccan journalist Hamid el-Mehdaoui was handed a four-month suspended prison sentence by a Casablanca court on Monday and ordered, along with a co-defendant named in the case, to pay a combined 100,000 Moroccan dirhams ($10,290) in damages for criminal defamation, according to the journalist's website and other news outlets," the Committee to Protect Journalists reported.

Advertisement

"Sudanese security officers have confiscated the entire print-run of El Jareeda daily newspaper in Khartoum, following a punishing six months for the country's media. In 2015 so far, 75 print runs from a variety of newspapers have been seized," Britain's Guardian newspaper reported Tuesday.