The William Monroe Trotter Group on Monday at Jackson State University. Standing, from left, Joe Davidson, Askia Muhammad, Wayne Dawkins, Rodney Brooks, Les Payne, Monroe Anderson, Randall Pinkston, DeWayne Wickham and Richard Prince. Seated, from left: Rochelle Riley, Tonyaa Weathersbee and Betty Bayé. Pinkston, a Jackson native who now reports for Al Jazeera America, was a presenter.
Trotter Group

Black Columnists Offer Tips for Success in Changing Field

Members of the William Monroe Trotter Group of African American columnists, meeting on the campus of Jackson State University in Jackson, Miss., were asked to impart advice to mass communications students on Tuesday. What they said sprang from decades of experience and was practical, heartfelt and at times emotional.

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The Trotter Group members and presenter Jackie Jones, associate professor and chairman of the Department of Multimedia Journalism at Morgan State University, were asked to summarize in writing for this column what they said. 

Monroe Anderson, veteran journalist, Chicago:

I was an editor at Ebony Magazine; I was the editor of Savoy Magazine. I’ve worked at newspapers. I was the press secretary to Mayor Eugene Sawyer in Chicago. I've worked in TV at the local CBS station in Chicago. I'm now a political blogger. I've done — not all at once, but in sequence — what you're learning at Jackson State University to do in this wonderful, cutting edge program they're developing here. You're learning and practicing all the media platforms you'll need in this evolving world of online journalism. Learn it, and well, and forge on.

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Betty Winston Bayé, Louisville, Ky., veteran of the Courier-Journal:

(1) Never use "irregardless." The correct word is regardless. I learned this from my first editor, Nancy Keefe [at Gannett newspapers in suburban New York].

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(2) Concentrate on learning to ask the RIGHT questions; for example, the yes/no question; the open-ended question (let your subject talk for a while. You probably won't be able to use most of what they say but there's almost always a kernel: something unexpected and wonderful that might be said); and, of course, the essential question, which is why you are interviewing this person/these people in the first place.

(3) Be observant: Notice what your subjects are wearing, their speech patterns and the photos and memorabilia on the walls, on their desks and on the bookcase. You learn a lot about people by what they wear, the books and magazines on their shelves and the things they surround themselves with.

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(4) If your subject seems to think you're stupid because they're so deep, play to that to get your story. Remember, it's not about you but about the story you're trying to get. And don't be shy about asking the person who feels superior to repeat a point that you really don't understand or that you haven't had enough time to write down.

Rodney Brooks, personal finance columnist, USA Today:

My advice is related to personal finance and is more personal than professional. Learn everything you can about finance and personal finance. Get and keep your own finances in order. You will already likely start life with student debt. Learn about credit cards and interest rates. Sign up for your company's 401(k) as soon as you can. And understand the importance of your credit report — and how much damage bad credit can do to you both personally and professionally. And read things you may not normally read. Grab a Wall Street Journal, a USA Today Money section or New York Times business section. You will be amazed at what you learn and what you retain.

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Joe Davidson, Federal Diary columnist, Washington Post:

Jesse Jackson likes to say we can be both ethnic and ethical. These are good words for journalists to keep in mind. We must be ethical. That means more than just not taking a bribe to write a story. Think of ethics as a reporting tool. Is our reporting inclusive? Have we considered many angles, many voices, many points of view? Do we go beyond conventional wisdom? Do we seek people, places, facts and situations often overlooked? Are we fair and accurate? Are we truth tellers?

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We can do this while being ethnic, while remembering those who sacrificed so we can be where we are today. We can do this while remembering that we have a responsibility to our communities. We can do this while remembering that as African Americans we bring a particular sensitivity to our craft and that is a good thing. We can do this while being black and proud and damn good journalists too.

Wayne Dawkins, associate professor, Hampton University:

You are witnessing what has been for us a violent transformation of traditional news media into something new that you will now inherit.

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How many of you are sophomores? [most of the 20 students' hands shoot up]

Well, because many of you were born in 1993, you are the first group of digital natives. All you've known is that there is good Internet service and good cell phone reception. When we talk about landline telephones and typewriters, you must think we are odd.

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Anyway, you're now in charge of this new medium.

Jackie Jones, Morgan State University, veteran journalist:

I cannot stress enough the importance of getting the basics. When it comes down to an employer choosing between you and someone else, don't give him a stick to beat you with. Your written and verbal skills, the way you dress, your preparation for the interview speak volumes.

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And remember why you are in this business. It's to tell our stories. Don't let others define you, your culture, your heritage, your legacy. You are being brought into this country's newsrooms to provide diversity, to tell readers, viewers, listeners something they don't already know. Make sure you know and make sure you bring it — every day.

Askia Muhammad, WPFW-FM, Washington; Final Call; Washington Informer:

I am senior editor of the Final Call newspaper, news director at WPFW-FM radio, and a columnist for the Washington Informer newspaper. My advice to students is this: Perfect your craft! Learn correct English grammar, spelling and punctuation. Take a speech/elocution class and learn to articulate correctly. The word is "ASK," it is not "AXE." It's pronounced "li-brary" not "li-berry." Because you are Black you will be stereotyped anyway, but you never want some smart-aleck to whisper about you in your newsroom: "She's dumb. She can't even spell 'opportunity.' " Perfect your craft now, while a mistake won't ruin your career.

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Richard Prince, "Journal-isms" columnist:

Learn as much as you can. We're now in the era of "backpack" journalists and the elimination of copy editors. You've got to learn to do it all yourself. Being technologically competent is a given, but knowing the basics — reading, writing, speaking well — remains the foundation of journalism.

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Rochelle Riley, columnist, Detroit Free Press:

Rochelle Riley stood and praised the students who were alert and paying attention, telling them that they would never know what person they met might be the one to get or give them a job one day. And, she said, one never knows who's watching.

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Then she asked questions about what the other Trotter members had said to them, offering $20 prizes to those who paid attention.

"Knowledge and awareness," she said. "Know who you are and know everything you can. You can't know too much, and you never know when you'll use what you learn."

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Tonyaa Weathersbee, columnist, Florida Times-Union:

My advice to aspiring black journalists is to get some mentors, particularly African-American mentors, early in your career, and to invest in yourself. Never believe that the company you work for is as concerned about your success and your fulfillment as you are. Also, never hesitate to take advantage of any free opportunities being offered to learn something new.

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"What's Your Propaganda?" Filmmaker Asks J-Students

The picture of Saartjie Baartman flashed on the screen during a Power Point presentation by the actor and filmmaker Tim Reid.

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Baartman was also known as the Hottentot Venus, "with buttocks of enormous size and with genitalia fabled to be equally disproportionate," in the words of the New York Times. Baartman was a black South African who was put on display for the amusement of Europeans at the beginning of the 19th century. "When she arrived in London in 1810, this young woman from South Africa became an overnight sensation in London's theater of human oddities. Her body was the object of prurient gaze, scientific fascination and disturbed bewilderment," the Times reported.

Reid paired photos of Baartman with those of rapper Nicki Minaj on all fours, rear end raised, along with some of her contemporaries, and asked, "What is your propaganda?"

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Quoting the legendary sociologist and intellectual W.E.B. Du Bois, Reid said all art is propaganda.

It was part of a presentation Tuesday before mass communication students at Jackson State University and members of the Trotter Group of African American columnists.

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Reid, co-creator and star of the beloved CBS show "Frank's Place" in 1987-88, said he told Paley, "I have not seen my culture as I know it on television." He told the students, "We have forgotten our power. Once you understand your power, you are more conscious of your message."

Reid said he asks contemporary entertainers, "What is your purpose? A lot of them don't know."

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Reid also said, "Until lions have their historians, tales of the [bush] will always glorify the hunter. That's who I am, a lion. It's time for the lion to have his story told."

Reid's credits include playing Venus Flytrap in the 1978-1982 series "WKRP in Cincinnati," playing Ray Campbell on the 1994-99 sitcom "Sister, Sister" and directing the 1995 movie "Once Upon a Time . . . When We Were Colored." He is also one of the few African American actors to own his own studio, built in Petersburg, Va.

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What his industry needs, Reid said, are journalists with wit. "News writers who know how to condense stories are worth their weight in gold," he said. "That kind of discipline is important."

He continued, "Where are the opportunities? So few people do anything well. The level of mediocrity in our business now is unbelievable. Quality and class and well-written stories still are important." He pointed to Will Rogers and Richard Pryor as able to craft their life experiences with wit as well as pathos. For too many other comedians, he said, "I see victimization."

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They're not asking Paley's question, Reid said.

Fox News Latino: Who loves big butts? Companies, gyms cash in on plump booty craze

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In Washington Post Piece, Woman Accuses Cosby of Rape

"In 2004, when Andrea Constand filed a lawsuit against Bill Cosby for sexual assault, her lawyers asked me to testify," Barbara Bowman wrote Thursday for the Washington Post under the headline, "Bill Cosby raped me. Why did it take 30 years for people to believe my story?"

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"Cosby had drugged and raped me, too, I told them. The lawyers said I could testify anonymously as a Jane Doe, but I ardently rejected that idea. My name is not Jane Doe. My name is Barbara Bowman, and I wanted to tell my story in court. In the end, I didn't have the opportunity to do that, because Cosby settled the suit for an undisclosed amount of money.

"Over the years, I've struggled to get people to take my story seriously. So last month, when reporter Lycia Naff contacted me for an interview for the Daily Mail, I gave her a detailed account. I told her how Cosby won my trust as a 17-year-old aspiring actress in 1985, brainwashed me into viewing him as a father figure, and then assaulted me multiple times.

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"In one case, I blacked out after having dinner and one glass of wine at his New York City brownstone, where he had offered to mentor me and discuss the entertainment industry. When I came to, I was in my panties and a man's t-shirt, and Cosby was looming over me. I'm certain now that he drugged and raped me. But as a teenager, I tried to convince myself I had imagined it. I even tried to rationalize it: Bill Cosby was going to make me a star and this was part of the deal.

"The final incident was in Atlantic City, where we had traveled for an industry event. I was staying in a separate bedroom of Cosby's hotel suite, but he pinned me down in his own bed while I screamed for help. I'll never forget the clinking of his belt buckle as he struggled to pull his pants off. I furiously tried to wrestle from his grasp until he eventually gave up, angrily called me 'a baby' and sent me home to Denver. . . ."

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The Post wrote in an editor's note, "A representative for Bill Cosby did not return multiple calls and e-mails from Washington Post staff for comment on this piece. Elsewhere, Cosby repeatedly denied separate sexual-assault allegations by Andrea Constand."

[During an interview with Cosby and his wife, Camille Cosby, at the Smithsonian Institution on Saturday's "Weekend Edition" on NPR, host Scott Simon asked Cosby whether he wanted to respond to the allegations. Cosby shook his head no without uttering a word, Simon told listeners.]

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Jenice Armstrong, Philadelphia Daily News: Old rape allegations against Bill Cosby resurface

Kate Aurthur, BuzzFeed: The Bill Cosby #CosbyMeme Hashtag Backfired Immediately

Bill Carter, New York Times: Appearance by Bill Cosby With David Letterman Canceled as Rape Allegations Swirl

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Marc Lamont Hill, HuffPost Live: Tommy Davidson: The Media Magnified Hannibal Buress' Cosby Takedown (Oct. 24)

Josie Pickens, Ebony: Mad at Cosby

Bill Wyman, Columbia Journalism Review: Why won’t journalists ask Bill Cosby the tough questions?

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On Net Neutrality, Could Cure Be Worse Than Disease?

"On Monday, President Obama urged the Federal Communications Commission to set stringent net neutrality rules to ensure the free flow of content on the information superhighway," Eduardo Porter reported Tuesday for the New York Times.

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"The regulations, he said, should ensure that 'neither the cable company nor the phone company will be able to act as a gatekeeper, restricting what you can do or see online.' To do so, he suggested classifying consumer broadband as a public utility — like telephone service or the company that delivers electricity to your home — allowing the F.C.C. to set precise proscriptions covering quality of service.

"In principle, this makes sense. It is hard to overstate the importance of broadband to America's economy and society. Free to do as they pleased, the clutch of companies that control access to the Internet would have enormous power to determine what information reaches Americans online.

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"But would the cure be worse than the disease, entangling the Internet in an endless fight over regulation and perhaps slowing investment in one of the nation’s most vital services? To some extent, it depends on how you view the threat. . . ."

Tim Wu, the Columbia University Law School professor who coined the term "net neutrality," is to be interviewed by Gautham Nagesh, Wall Street Journal technology policy reporter, on C-SPAN's "The Communicators" Saturday at 6:30 p.m. Eastern time and Monday on C-SPAN2 at 8 a.m. and 8 p.m.

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John Eggerton, Multichannel News: Tim Wu: Obama Has Hit 'Reset' On 'Net Rule Proposals

Brian Fung and Nancy Scola, Washington Post: Obama's call for an open Internet puts him at odds with regulators

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Tracie Powell, alldigitocracy.org: It's Obama vs. Civil Rights Groups Over Net Neutrality

Michael Scurato, National Hispanic Media Coalition: Obama Stands with Millions of Americans for Internet Equality. What's Next?

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White House: Net Neutrality: President Obama's Plan for a Free and Open Internet

Edward Wyatt, New York Times: Obama's Call for Net Neutrality Sets Up Fight Over Rules

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Condé Nast to Pay $5.8 Million to 7,500 Ex-Interns

"Condé Nast agreed on Thursday to pay $5.8 million to settle a class-action lawsuit brought by thousands of former interns at the publisher who said they were underpaid for work at the company's high-end magazines," Mica Rosenberg reported Thursday for Reuters.

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"The settlement agreement, filed in U.S. District Court in New York, covers around 7,500 interns at Condé Nast magazines like Vogue and Vanity Fair. The case is one in a wave of recent suits brought against media and entertainment companies that pay little or nothing for internships.

"Condé Nast canceled its internship program soon after the lawsuit was filed in June 2013. . . ."

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Suzan Shown Harjo to Receive Medal of Freedom

"Suzan Shown Harjo may be best known for her work on the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, or the American Indian Religious Act, but the writer, curator and activist has advocated for much more in the improvement of Native American lives," the Indian Country Media Network reported on Thursday.

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"Her name is also synonymous with the fight against the NFL's Washington football team over its use of the term Redskins and its mascot.

"Now, the president of the Morning Star Institute and former member of the Carter Administration, will be known as a Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient.

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"President Barack Obama named 19 honorees (including: Alvin Ailey, Isabel Allende, Tom Brokaw, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, Michael Schwerner, Mildred Dresselhaus, John Dingell, Ethel Kennedy, Abner Mikva, Patsy Takemoto Mink, Edward Roybal, Charles Sifford, Robert Solow, Stephen Sondheim, Meryl Streep, Marlo Thomas, and Stevie Wonder) on November 10 to receive the nation’s highest civilian honor. . . ."

Harjo, Cheyenne and Muscogee, also represents the Native American Journalists Association on the board of directors of Unity: Journalists for Diversity.

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HistoryMakers Given $1.6 Million to Talk Up Black Success

The HistoryMakers, a Chicago-based organization that records oral histories of successful African Americans, including a substantial number of journalists, will receive $1.6 million to add 2,000 interviews to its video oral history project, Shannon Schuyler, president of the PwC Charitable Foundation, Inc., announced on Nov. 8.

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Schuyler made the announcement from a stage at the Library of Congress, where 450 participants in the project gathered to celebrate a decision by the library to incorporate the current oral histories into its collections. They also served as the audience for an upcoming PBS show in which NPR's Michele Norris interviewed PBS' Gwen Ifill, a longtime supporter of the project, about her life. The project has named about 2,600 HistoryMakers, Julieanna Richardson, founder and executive director, told Journal-isms.

Among the 450 black achievers present were Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr.; the Rev. Jesse Jackson; lawyer and presidential friend Vernon Jordan, presidential adviser Valerie Jarrett; and singer Dionne Warwick. At least 50 media figures were present.

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According to the HistoryMakers website, "In 2009, Herb and Sheran Wilkins provided The HistoryMakers with a gift to interview 150 of the nation's top African American MediaMakers. The goal of the MediaMakers initiative is to increase the current interview collection within the MediaMakers category from 200 to a total of 350 interviews and to digitize, encode, transcribe, index and catalog the MediaMakers oral history interviews. . . ."

In explaining her company's grant, Schuyler wrote Monday for the Huffington Post, "It's not just a matter of setting the record straight. Certainly, we must tell the untold stories of the innumerable achievements of African Americans in every realm of American life — the arts, sports, medicine, education, science, the media, business and government — despite the obstacles and challenges.

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"But more importantly, we must support an educational philosophy and tools that systematically help them both understand and acquire the fundamental skills they will need to succeed personally and professionally: goal-setting, the ability to communicate effectively, financial literacy. Every student must believe in his potential for success; every student needs role models with whom she can identify and strive to emulate; and every student needs to feel encouraged to aspire to positions of responsibility and leadership. . . ."

Washington Post Debuts Interactive Project on "N-Word"

"This year the NFL instructed game officials to penalize players who used the n-word on the field of play. David Sheinin and Krissah Thompson, write about how the policy, met by widespread criticism, followed a year marked by several incidents of players deploying America's most divisive racial slur," the Washington Post said in an announcement on Monday.

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"As the league wrestled with the issue, a team of Washington Post journalists spoke with more than 70 people over the last eight months examining the history of this singularly American word and its place in American vernacular today. Hear from former NFL players Donte Stallworth and Leigh Bodden; Byron De La Beckwith Jr., Ku Klux Klansman; Neal Brennan, co-creator of 'Chappelle's Show,' and more discuss the nuance of the n-word in an interactive project here. . . ."

Don Lemon, BlackAmericaWeb.com: Don Lemon Is Tired Of Debating The N-Word, Use It If You Want To

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John McWhorter, The Root: It's Time We Recognize That 'N—ga' Isn't 'N—ger'

Arielle Newton, Huffington Post: The 'N' Word, Piers Morgan, and the Myth of Black Respectability

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At Protest, Station Owner Defends #Pointergate

"Communications mogul Stanley Hubbard, speaking at Augsburg College on Thursday, was forced to defend a controversial story that aired last week on one of his Minneapolis stations," Libor Jany reported Friday for the Star Tribune in Minneapolis.

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"About 30 protesters, some waggling large red foam fingers typical at sporting events, stood up and roared at Hubbard, whose television station, KSTP-TV, had come under fire for airing a story claiming that Mayor Betsy Hodges was making a gang sign in a photograph with a young black canvasser. The story, which triggered a wave of criticism across social media calling for an on-air apology from the station, has been held up by critics as an example of racial bias in the media. . . ."

Samaria Bailey, Philadelphia Tribune: Panel talks image of Black men in the news

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Mayor Betsy Hodges blog: #pointergate

Tracie Powell, alldigitocracy.org: #Pointergate, the anti-journalism

Eric Roper, Star Tribune, Minneapolis: Hodges: Pointergate has shined light on police misconduct problems

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Short Takes

"The tenth class of Ailes Apprentice Program graduates were honored at Fox News yesterday," Brian Flood reported Thursday for TVNewser. "Over the last decade, 42 apprentices have been through the program that Fox News co-founder, CEO and chairman Roger Ailes started in 2003. Flood also wrote, "This year's graduation, hosted by Bill Hemmer and Harris Faulkner, featured guest speakers Dr. Bernice A. King, Dr. Alveda C. King, Bishop T.D. Jakes and special video [shoutouts] from Smokey Robinson, Gladys Knight and Rita Moreno. . . ."

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"President Barack Obama pressed for greater freedoms Friday for reporters in Myanmar and China while defending the balance he said the U.S. seeks to strike at home," Josh Lederman reported for the Associated Press. "Although he said he couldn't discuss the case of a U.S. journalist under pressure by prosecutors, he echoed comments from his attorney general that journalists won't be jailed for doing their job. . . ."

"The New York Times pushed back against Chinese President Xi Jinping in an editorial published Wednesday evening after Xi Jinping snubbed Times reporter Mark Landler during a press conference and all but confirmed the Chinese government had been blocking reporters from getting credentials to report in the country," Brianna Ehley reported Thursday for FishbowlDC.

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"On 60 Minutes, CBS reporter Lara Logan . . . presented a dramatic and emotional account of the fight against Ebola at one treatment facility in Liberia," Peter Hart reported Friday for Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting. "But there was just one problem: Liberians didn't speak on the broadcast. . . ."

"The Washington Post's editorial page has found 'problematic' sourcing in five columns written by Fareed Zakaria and will likely note the lack of attribution in archived editions of the articles, the section's editor said," Paul Farhi reported Monday for the Post. "Fred Hiatt, The Post's editorial page editor, said he would act after the anonymously written blog Our Bad Media on Monday posted, side by side, excerpts from six Zakaria's columns and work published earlier by other writers. . . ."  The editorial pages added a note about the lack of attribution. The newspaper corrected four Zakaria columns.

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"More than two in three Latinos fear the police will use excessive force against them, according to a survey released Tuesday measuring Hispanic attitudes about a range of social and political issues," Roque Planas reported Wednesday for HuffPost LatinoVoices. "Though the nationwide poll of 1,000 Latino adults found broad support for the notion that police forces exist to protect the public, a large swath of respondents expressed fear about their interactions with law enforcement and a sizeable minority said they knew someone who had experienced excessive force at the hands of police. . . ."

Rhonda Graham, editorial writer and columnist for the News Journal in Wilmington, Del., since 2005, left the newspaper on Nov. 7, Graham told Journal-isms. She wrote on her Facebook page Monday, "It was time to go. It was my decision to turn down their job offers and to pursue new opportunities that are aligned with my personal goals. . . ." She told Journal-isms she had not decided what she would do next.

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"Kwame Holman comes to Medill after 31 years as a producer, writer, and reporter on politics and policy," according to an announcement on the website of the Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications at Northwestern University. "An experienced national television news correspondent, he also has covered farm finances, science, and medicine. His strong and distinctive narration voice is well-known. From 1983 to 2014, Kwame worked for the PBS NewsHour (formerly the MacNeil-Lehrer NewsHour) spending the last 20 years as Congressional Correspondent then Political Correspondent. . . ."

"Sources . . . tell TVNewser that Dee Dee Thomas . . . is out as Executive Producer of 'Weekend Today,' but will continue to work on other projects at NBC," Brian Flood wrote Friday for TV Newser. "Thomas had been EP of the Weekend editions of the morning shows since 2011. . . ."

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"Danica Lo has been named online editor-at-large for Glamour, a new role at the magazine," Chris O'Shea reported Wednesday for FishbowlNY. "This is a homecoming for Lo, who previously served as Glamour.com's fashion and beauty editor. . . ."

"The Sugarhill Gang's 'Rapper's Delight' is considered the song that started it all for hip-hop in 1979 (video)," Kevin Eck reported Friday for TVSpy. In Atlanta, "WSB anchor Fred Blankenship saluted the memory of Sugarhill Gang member Big Bank Hank, who died this week from cancer," Eck continued, linking to a video of Blankenship performing a rap in tribute.

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"Today is Adolfo Flores' last day as a reporter for the Los Angeles Times," Veronica Villafañe reported Thursday for her Media Moves site. "He starts a new job as Latino issues reporter for BuzzFeed News next Monday, November 17. He'll be based in Los Angeles. . . .'

"This is Life with Lisa Ling" is one of three original series that CNN has decided will return next year, Brian Flood reported Thursday for TVNewser.

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Fernando Diaz will join the Center for Investigative Reporting in December as a senior editor, the Center reported Thursday. "Diaz is currently the managing editor of Hoy Chicago, one of the largest circulation Spanish-language newspapers in the U.S., and vivelohoy.com, where he directs multiplatform content strategy and technology development. . . ."

The Marshall Project, the startup on criminal justice issues, debuts on Sunday, Editor Bill Keller told Journal-isms by email on Friday. "We're partnering with the WaPo in Sunday and Monday papers, and the first stuff will go up on our newly designed website some time Saturday night." The site hired its second journalist of color in Corey G. Johnson of the Center for Investigative Reporting. "Corey will be based in Atlanta, where he is from, with frequent visits to NYC," Keller said. Simone Weichselbaum, formerly of the Daily News in New York, was hired in June.

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"CNN's Washington bureau is suffering from low morale and high anxiety in the wake of weeks of layoffs and buyouts — with one employee likening the place to the Redskins' locker room," Dylan Byers reported Monday for Politico. "In conversations with POLITICO, sources at the bureau spoke of tension in the office as several longtime staffers have been let go while others are being promoted and given raises. On Friday, during the most recent departures, 'people were crying all over the bureau,' one D.C. employee said. . . ." The cutbacks have affected black journalists.

"Building off the success of sponsoring a Diversity Caucus earlier this year, UNITY: Journalists for Diversity seeks to expand its efforts to diversify newsrooms in 2015," the organization announced on Monday. "Among initiatives that the board discussed during its fall board meeting Nov. 8-9: UNITY will convene a 2015 follow-up to the spring 2014 Diversity Caucus with a focus on how technology and diversity can be best used to reach news consumers. . . ."

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"Members of the black and Latino press are livid at the NBA for what some say are discriminatory new media rules for games," Stacy Brown reported Sunday for the New York Post. "The league has quietly revoked floor access to photojournalists for small¬er publications, saying there's not enough room. Three seasons ago, the NBA allowed 40 camera positions, but this season they are now allowing just 20, 10 on each baseline. . . ."

"Edna Schmidt, who was a top news anchor at two Spanish-language stations in Chicago, is suing one of them for firing her when she appeared drunk on the air," Robert Feder reported Monday on his Chicago television blog. "A lawsuit filed in federal court last week claims Telemundo Station Group’s WSNS-Channel 44 and parent company NBCUniversal violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by failing to provide Schmidt 'reasonable accommodation' for her alcoholism. . . ."

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FierceforBlackWomen.com and The Root have partnered to publish "Dealing With Dementia: A Son Tells His Story" written as part of Yanick Rice Lamb's participation in the MetLife Foundation Journalists in Aging Fellows Program. Lamb's fellowship topic is "Guides for caregiving and dementia-care for African Americans."

"Univision Communications today entered into a partnership with the University of Miami's School of Communication to create a student-managed infographics unit for Univision News," TVNewsCheck reported Nov. 5. "Univision says the partnership expands its commitment 'to help develop future leaders in the field of journalism by providing professional opportunities to talented students.' . . ."

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"Stories by Oluwatoyosi Ogunseye, the first female top editor in the 40-year history of a prominent Nigerian paper, have sparked important changes in her community," Benjamin Mullin reported Monday for the Poynter Institute. "On Monday, they earned her a Knight International Journalism Award from the International Center for Journalists. The award, which honors journalists around the world who improve the lives of their audiences, was presented to Ogunseye Monday night at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C. The other recipient was Alejandra Xanic von Bertrab, a freelance investigative journalist from Mexico. . . ."

"As an entrepreneur and hair enthusiast, Riqua Hailes opened two specialty salons, Just Extensions Salon, Los Angeles' first Hair Extensions Salon, and The Weave Express in Washington DC," Deena Campbell reported Friday for Essence. "But after learning the business of running two salons, Hailes decided she wanted to tell the true story of the hair industry. What hair is good hair? Is Remy better than Brazilian hair? Hailes began her journey in March where she traveled to not only the sources of the hair, but to the people in which this industry has a deep root in. . . . We caught up with Hailes and took a deep dive into her experiences and findings in discovering the truth about extensions. Take a look at her photos and be sure to stay tuned in 2015 for her first film, Just Extensions The Documentary, in which she highlights her journey. . . ."